Photo Gallery: MotoAmerica At First Glance

I was totally unprepared for the sensory circus that is motorcycle road racing. But then, I was duped—set up, really. I’d been told, “It’s better on TV,” a classic line from those who either have forgotten or haven’t experienced the magic and rage of Superbikes wide open.

Thirty camera positions no doubt make for comfortable viewing—easy to follow the progress of a race. But the smooth pans and muted braaps of television are almost a lie; without context, it’s impossible to appreciate a Superbike race on TV.

Supersport race-winner JD Beach with a young fan, Sabrina Leisner.

The live race experience is about more than watching. At Mazda Raceway Laguna Seca, fans were a part of the MotoAmerica/World Superbike action. They were invited to rider press conferences and free to roam the paddock, where factory teams and privateers wrenched away between rounds.

With access to everything, I became a superbike tourist. I watched as mechanics—often a racer’s dad—cleaned brakes or swapped a tire. I posed on $150,000 motorcycles and discovered that “umbrella girls” is a thing.

Throughout the weekend, I clung to fences for qualifying and racing, feeding off the power, speed, and sound—man, the sound—as riders accelerated, testing the limits of tire grip and mettle. I burned cellular data, desperate to share my first impressions of Superbike racing, and fired off texts, most starting with “Holy … ”

The takeaway: I’ve bought a ticket to MotoAmerica’s eighth stop this weekend at Indianapolis Motor Speedway because, well, TV isn’t even close.

Kurt Hoy joined the Bonnier Motorcycle Group in July as Content Strategy Director. Hoy comes to Bonnier Corp. from the Competitor Group, where he served as Senior VP, Audience Development.

I was totally unprepared for the sensory circus that is motorcycle road racing. But then, I was duped—set up, really. I’d been told, “It’s better on TV,” a classic line from those who either have forgotten or haven’t experienced the magic and rage of Superbikes wide open.

Thirty camera positions no doubt make for comfortable viewing—easy to follow the progress of a race. But the smooth pans and muted braaps of television are almost a lie; without context, it’s impossible to appreciate a Superbike race on TV.

Supersport race-winner JD Beach with a young fan, Sabrina Leisner.

The live race experience is about more than watching. At Mazda Raceway Laguna Seca, fans were a part of the MotoAmerica/World Superbike action. They were invited to rider press conferences and free to roam the paddock, where factory teams and privateers wrenched away between rounds.

With access to everything, I became a superbike tourist. I watched as mechanics—often a racer’s dad—cleaned brakes or swapped a tire. I posed on $150,000 motorcycles and discovered that “umbrella girls” is a thing.

Throughout the weekend, I clung to fences for qualifying and racing, feeding off the power, speed, and sound—man, the sound—as riders accelerated, testing the limits of tire grip and mettle. I burned cellular data, desperate to share my first impressions of Superbike racing, and fired off texts, most starting with “Holy … ”

The takeaway: I’ve bought a ticket to MotoAmerica’s eighth stop this weekend at Indianapolis Motor Speedway because, well, TV isn’t even close.

Kurt Hoy joined the Bonnier Motorcycle Group in July as Content Strategy Director. Hoy comes to Bonnier Corp. from the Competitor Group, where he served as Senior VP, Audience Development.

Bryce Eikelberger, Monster Energy Graves Yamaha.

Under the skin of an Aprilia RSVR.

Calendar photo shoot.

Dunlop GP-A Pro front tire.

Matt Myers, father of MotoAmerica Superbike racer Elena Myers

Aprilia World Superbike rider Jordi Torres (right) and a fan.

Bazzaz Superstock 600 race winner Joe Roberts.

Ducati umbrella girls at Mazda Raceway.

KTM RC 390 Cup racer Drew Sivertsen.

MotoAmerica Bazzaz Superstock 600 Champion Joe Roberts.

Mazda Raceway WSBK double-winner Chaz Davies with fellow Ducati rider Leandro Mercado.

Four-time AMA Superbike Champion Josh Hayes (right) and his crew chief, Jim Roach.

Supersport racer Corey Alexander (middle) listening to Josh Hayes.

Supersport machines at tech inspection.

Aprilia mechanic with Jordi Torres’ RSV4.

Supersport race-winner JD Beach with a young fan, Sabrina Leisner.

TOBC Racing umbrella girl.