For Dane: Josh Day is a good fit at Yamalube/Westby Racing.

Westby Racing Joshua Day Road Atlanta action

With a victory at Road Atlanta, Josh Day is fitting in well at his new home, Yamalube/Westby Racing.

In 2011, Dane Westby crashed on the closing lap of the Daytona 200, on the fastest part of the track. He was in a pack of five racers fighting for an advantage to take the win, as they wheel-to-wheel approached the checkered flag. Another rider elbowed his front brake lever, locking up Westby’s front wheel and throwing him to the pavement. After his crash, Westby got up and walked away, though a bit burned and abraded from sliding over 100 yards on dry pavement.

I chatted with Westby shortly after he escaped from his medical check-up in the track emergency room, less than an hour after his crash. I welcomed him into the 150-mph-plus crash club. We shared our impressions of skidding on our backs at crazy speeds. We had a good laugh.

Two months ago, Westby had an inexplicable streetbike accident at moderately low speeds, while riding across town in his home of Tulsa, Oklahoma. But he didn’t slide; he suffered immediate fatal impact with things. On March 23, 2015, there wasn’t anyone to laugh with, and there was nothing to laugh about.

Read the entire story, written by Cycle World Contributing Editor Peter Jones, here.

Westby Racing Joshua Day Road Atlanta action

With a victory at Road Atlanta, Josh Day is fitting in well at his new home, Yamalube/Westby Racing.

In 2011, Dane Westby crashed on the closing lap of the Daytona 200, on the fastest part of the track. He was in a pack of five racers fighting for an advantage to take the win, as they wheel-to-wheel approached the checkered flag. Another rider elbowed his front brake lever, locking up Westby’s front wheel and throwing him to the pavement. After his crash, Westby got up and walked away, though a bit burned and abraded from sliding over 100 yards on dry pavement.

I chatted with Westby shortly after he escaped from his medical check-up in the track emergency room, less than an hour after his crash. I welcomed him into the 150-mph-plus crash club. We shared our impressions of skidding on our backs at crazy speeds. We had a good laugh.

Two months ago, Westby had an inexplicable streetbike accident at moderately low speeds, while riding across town in his home of Tulsa, Oklahoma. But he didn’t slide; he suffered immediate fatal impact with things. On March 23, 2015, there wasn’t anyone to laugh with, and there was nothing to laugh about.

Read the entire story, written by Cycle World Contributing Editor Peter Jones, here.

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