Cycle News Profiles MotoAmerica Superbike Racer Elena Myers

Elena Myers CN

Racing is an unkind business. It is sport at its most brutal—there’s nowhere to hide on track or the timesheet—you live and breath by your results. So on paper, Elena Myers’ first foray into the hotbed of AMA Superbike competition may not seem like she’s setting the world on fire.

But that’s not the whole story. Already the most successful female racer in the history of American road racing, being a rider is just one of the caps she wears on a race weekend. She’s also the team owner, sponsor entertainer, unofficial poster child for aspiring female racers across the country. There’s a steely determination in the eye of this 21-year-old Californian. While most women her age are finding the wonders and terrors of legal drinking, Myers is trying to find ways of going faster, ways of improving her chances of making a living out of a sport where so many have failed before.

“I think I’ve always had a bit of the entrepreneurial side about me,” Myers states in amongst the nation’s motorcycle media at the Arai Corsair-X launch at Thunderhill Raceway in Northern California. She’s here as a sponsored Arai rider, introduced to journalists alongside Nicky Hayden and Randy Mamola, two riders who have earned Czar-like status in American racing.

“The business side of racing has always interested me, so being able to hire the people I want and get things the way I like has been great,” she says. “The hardest part has been managing everybody on a race weekend, especially when something’s not going right. Sometimes I can be too nice and not speak my mind. I have to remind myself that this is my team. I’m putting this together for me, and it has to be right for me.”

Read the rest of Rennie Scaysbrook’s interview with Myers here.

Elena Myers CN

Racing is an unkind business. It is sport at its most brutal—there’s nowhere to hide on track or the timesheet—you live and breath by your results. So on paper, Elena Myers’ first foray into the hotbed of AMA Superbike competition may not seem like she’s setting the world on fire.

But that’s not the whole story. Already the most successful female racer in the history of American road racing, being a rider is just one of the caps she wears on a race weekend. She’s also the team owner, sponsor entertainer, unofficial poster child for aspiring female racers across the country. There’s a steely determination in the eye of this 21-year-old Californian. While most women her age are finding the wonders and terrors of legal drinking, Myers is trying to find ways of going faster, ways of improving her chances of making a living out of a sport where so many have failed before.

“I think I’ve always had a bit of the entrepreneurial side about me,” Myers states in amongst the nation’s motorcycle media at the Arai Corsair-X launch at Thunderhill Raceway in Northern California. She’s here as a sponsored Arai rider, introduced to journalists alongside Nicky Hayden and Randy Mamola, two riders who have earned Czar-like status in American racing.

“The business side of racing has always interested me, so being able to hire the people I want and get things the way I like has been great,” she says. “The hardest part has been managing everybody on a race weekend, especially when something’s not going right. Sometimes I can be too nice and not speak my mind. I have to remind myself that this is my team. I’m putting this together for me, and it has to be right for me.”

Read the rest of Rennie Scaysbrook’s interview with Myers here.