Motorcycle electronic countermeasures were in their infancy when Wayne Rainey won his first 500cc Grand Prix world title in 1990. At Donington Park that year, Team Roberts outfitted Rainey’s Yamaha YZR500 with a rudimentary ignition retard using a switch borrowed, no lie, from Rainey’s motorhome.

According to Rainey, the intention was to “knock the edge off” the two-stroke’s steep torque curve exiting Donington’s first-gear Melbourne hairpin. Unfortunately, the fix didn’t work as well as hoped; Rainey finished second that day to Kevin Schwantz. (The switch is still on the bike; visit the Petersen Automotive Museum to see for yourself.)

Read the full story at CycleWorld.com.

Motorcycle electronic countermeasures were in their infancy when Wayne Rainey won his first 500cc Grand Prix world title in 1990. At Donington Park that year, Team Roberts outfitted Rainey’s Yamaha YZR500 with a rudimentary ignition retard using a switch borrowed, no lie, from Rainey’s motorhome.

According to Rainey, the intention was to “knock the edge off” the two-stroke’s steep torque curve exiting Donington’s first-gear Melbourne hairpin. Unfortunately, the fix didn’t work as well as hoped; Rainey finished second that day to Kevin Schwantz. (The switch is still on the bike; visit the Petersen Automotive Museum to see for yourself.)

Read the full story at CycleWorld.com.