The National Dizzy and Balance Center (NDBC) combines physicians, audiologists, and physical therapists in the same facility for a multi-disciplinary approach to dizziness, balance disorders, and concussions. This is what makes NDBC clinics unique in the treatment of balance disorders.

For a recent NDBC television commercial, MotoAmerica KTM RC 390 Cup racer Mason De Keyrel was asked to demonstrate steps that the center performs to diagnose concussions, balance disorders, and dizziness.

The producer began with a shot of De Keyrel using a step ladder for various exercises. The second shot involved a machine that tests the subject’s balance and on which foot he or she places more weight when standing.

“If you put pressure on your heels or toes, the wall will move,” De Keyrel said, “so you want to be as still as possible. Next, if you put pressure on your heels or toes, the floor moves. After that, they do the test with both the wall and floor moving.”

In another test, De Keyrel was asked to walk down a hallway while looking up and down and side to side.

“As you walk,” he said, “they look to see if you stumble. After that, a doctor checks your eyes with a light. The doctor also makes you follow his finger as he moves it up and down and from side to side. Then he starts with his finger far away and comes close to your face. If you see two fingers, you tell him.”

De Keyrel said he enjoyed the experience and has a newfound appreciation for the work NDBC does and the effort that goes into the making of a TV commercial.

The National Dizzy and Balance Center (NDBC) combines physicians, audiologists, and physical therapists in the same facility for a multi-disciplinary approach to dizziness, balance disorders, and concussions. This is what makes NDBC clinics unique in the treatment of balance disorders.

For a recent NDBC television commercial, MotoAmerica KTM RC 390 Cup racer Mason De Keyrel was asked to demonstrate steps that the center performs to diagnose concussions, balance disorders, and dizziness.

The producer began with a shot of De Keyrel using a step ladder for various exercises. The second shot involved a machine that tests the subject’s balance and on which foot he or she places more weight when standing.

“If you put pressure on your heels or toes, the wall will move,” De Keyrel said, “so you want to be as still as possible. Next, if you put pressure on your heels or toes, the floor moves. After that, they do the test with both the wall and floor moving.”

In another test, De Keyrel was asked to walk down a hallway while looking up and down and side to side.

“As you walk,” he said, “they look to see if you stumble. After that, a doctor checks your eyes with a light. The doctor also makes you follow his finger as he moves it up and down and from side to side. Then he starts with his finger far away and comes close to your face. If you see two fingers, you tell him.”

De Keyrel said he enjoyed the experience and has a newfound appreciation for the work NDBC does and the effort that goes into the making of a TV commercial.